Before happily welcoming a new feline addition into your home, there are a few necessary tasks to address. Creating a space for them to feel comfortable and secure is essential because cats spend most of their time indoors. There are a lot of things to take into consideration beforehand, such as living space and possibly the pets already living with you.

It is exciting to bring home a fresh addition to the family, so here are a few things to take into consideration when getting ready for your fur baby:

Adequate space

  • Take into consideration the size of your home. Is it large enough for your pet? Will they have adequate territory to do what they want or not? Do you have other pets in the house, and will that create a problem? Think things through first before getting a new addition. Cats need their space to roam around, play and establish a territory, especially if they are among other cats.

Get rid of hazards

  • Cats are known for their curiosity and persistence; They tend to play with anything they could find. From cords, long drapes, tassels, and even rubber bands, they can be hazardous to felines of any size and age. Make sure to put small objects in containers and chemical substances in areas that are hidden or out of reach. Cut the cords to a shorter length or undo the knots at the end.
  • Several household plants are toxic to cats, such as aloe, irises, ivy, and lilies. If you own house plants, it is best to research which ones you need to keep away from your pet. Move them outdoors or into another room away from anything harmful.

Arrange a safe room

  • Creating a safe sanctuary for the new furry addition to your family will help them integrate better into your home. It is a fact that cats are territorial– moving into a new home will make them feel uneasy and scared. Provide a small area for them to live in for a few days or weeks, a bathroom or laundry room works very well. Keep other pets, family members, and guests out in the meantime.
  • If you do not have a separate room to use, create a private section in a secluded or vacant corner using one or two tall screens.
  • Fill it with cat amenities and ensure that there is plenty of space for you to sit as well. Place their food and water bowls in a separate area from their litter box. Spend time with them frequently, but keep them short. Your goal is for them to get used to your scent and build a bond.

Get everything your cat will need

  • A carrier to bring your pet home in. Make sure that the crate is not too small for the cat you intend to adopt.
  • A collar with an identification tag. Getting them microchipped is also an option. These are necessary in case they might get lost or escape the house.
  • Food, water, and cat litter with containers and scooper. A rule of thumb is to provide one litter box for each cat and add one to the total.
  • Cat bed or cocoon to sleep and rest in.
  • Create vertical space for them to jump onto. Getting a cat tree and shelves would give them enough space to go around.
  • Toys that will keep your cat entertained and a scratching post to lessen the chances of them destroying furniture.
  • Grooming tools such as brush and claw trimmers.
Comfy Cat

Be ready to transition them beyond their safe room

  • Once you have established a trusting relationship with your feline companion, they are ready to start exploring the rest of the house under supervision. Close the doors to rooms for the meantime; this will begin their orientation in stages. It can get overwhelming for them if introduced to too many new spaces all at once. 

Introducing them to existing pets in your household

  • Avoid immediately introducing your new cat to your other pets upon arrival. Doing this might damage new relationships and trigger fear, anger, aggression, and additional problems between the latest feline addition to your resident cats and other pets. Successful introductions take a lot of time and patience.
  • Let them sniff out the situation first. Let your pets sniff each other under the door for the next few days to help them familiarize each other’s scents. Move onto placing your new cat in a carrier and put them outside of the safe room, do so 2 to 3 times daily– if possible. Once you’ve seen that they’re comfortable with each other, introduce them to your other pets face to face.

Photo by Monica Silvestre from Pexels